2 years ago
redpepperquilts:

Postage Stamp Quilt

Wow, that must have taken forever.

redpepperquilts:

Postage Stamp Quilt

Wow, that must have taken forever.

2 years ago

mortellement:

So I started this quilt about three months ago and I’ve only just gotten around to starting this post. There’s quite a lot of information in it so i’ll break it up into a couple of posts.

First of all, What is a pixel quilt?
A pixel quilt is a simple square patchwork quilt where each of the patches is arranged so that the whole quilt will form an image. I chose the red mushroom from mario 

The quilt is double bed sized and I managed to make the whole thing for under $50

Materials;

  • 4 meters fabric in your choice of colours ( the amount depends on what sized quilt you want and how big you decide to make each of your squares ) 
  • Long pins 
  • Matching colours of thread 
  • Scissors
  • Thick cardboard
  • Wadding ( I found an old double bed doona insert that had the covering falling off, I  stripped it of the outside fabric and used the wadding inside)
  • Double bed sheet (for backing, you can use store bought fabric and piece it together to size. But using sheets is cheaper and easier) 
  • Binding ( store brought or you can make your own) 

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I used this pattern which I found on google 

Each square represents one of the patchwork squares. I found it easier to change the colours on paint to show where each of my Squares needed to go ( Otherwise I just became hopelessly confused) 

Now for the super fun part ( note the sarcasm) 

Firstly I counted out the number of squares i would need in each colour 

Total squares - 324 ( I cut out five extra of each colour)

Blue - 94

White - 78

Red - 60

Black - 90

(This count could be wrong , I’m pretty sleepy) 

I decided to place one of the blue rows from the bottom onto the top of the mushroom for symmetry. 

And now for the even more fun part, Cutting up the 324 ish squares 

There are easier ways to do this if you have a rotary blade, a self healing cutting mat and a square ruler. As i’m poor and like to do things on the cheap, I traced my measurements onto a square piece of thick cardboard that measured 11cm by 11cm. I then used this template to trace my squares onto the fabric the whole 300 and something times -.-

It helps to be watching a movie or something while doing this as it is really boring. 

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After cutting out all of the patches, I decided to organize them into each of the rows as I would sew them.

I used the numbers 1 - 18 to order each of the rows vertically 

Then it was time to start sewing 

This is one of the rows that I had started sewing together into chains. 

Once you have finished sewing together all of the patches into the vertical rows it is time to sew these rows together. 

Carefully making sure that all of the seems are on the back of the quilt ( yes i had to unpick a couple of times due to uncoordination) 

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Once you have finished this you now have a completed quilt cover front ( or like me you will get excited half way through and stop to take pictures) 

Now is the time to decide, to quilt or not to quilt. that is the question. 

after properly quilting my pixel quilt I would not recommend it to anyone 

Just turn it into a doona cover and be done with it. 

If like me you are a masochist, firstly lay out your sheet backing, then the wadding and finally your patchwork quilt front. Then go to town with the pins.

I pinned each and every square.

Then I used my sewing machine (without a walking foot because I am an idiot)
To follow each of the lines and do a basic “stitch in the ditch” pattern on my quilt. About half way through my sewing machine stopped working, though as i have had it for 10 years that could explain it. After this i hand sewed the rest of my quilt. 

I also sewed on the binding completely by hand, which you can avoid if you just make a doona cover out of your quilt front. 

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Overall this quilt was a fun project that I got a lot of satisfaction out of in the end. 

It is probably a project that you need moderate sewing skills for. Though I have never quilted before and decided to learn with this quilt. I plan to make a squirtle quilt next.

Some notes

  • Make sure you cut out the pieces correctly, some of my pieces were slightly smaller resulting in rows that did not quite match up 
  • Pre-wash your fabric to prevent runs
  • Make sure to back-stitch each of the patches in the chains, particularly if you are just making a doona cover.


     Most of all enjoy your new quilt, if you have any problems feel free to ask :)  

This is what we’re talking about. 

2 years ago
it8bit:

My Grandma Made This!
Created by Mîrzac Alexandra
Up for voting at threadless!

Video game crafts. Win. 

it8bit:

My Grandma Made This!

Created by Mîrzac Alexandra

Up for voting at threadless!

Video game crafts. Win. 

(via it8Bit)
2 years ago

A QR code, or Quick Response code is a somewhat new technology that, when scanned by a smart phone or iPad app, takes you to a website or texts you with more information about a product. You see them everywhere now, from cereal boxes to bus stops. From the moment Jake got his new phone, he was obsessed with them. I remember he used to talk about how production at Spoonflower could be more efficient if we could just walk around scanning QR codes to look up orders and find out information about rolls of fabric. As for me, I just liked how they resembled little patchwork quilts. So when the staff challenge was announced, the idea of making a QR code quilt seemed perfect.

How novel! If it actually works for code readers, this could be a lot of fun for shops to work with.

A QR code, or Quick Response code is a somewhat new technology that, when scanned by a smart phone or iPad app, takes you to a website or texts you with more information about a product. You see them everywhere now, from cereal boxes to bus stops. From the moment Jake got his new phone, he was obsessed with them. I remember he used to talk about how production at Spoonflower could be more efficient if we could just walk around scanning QR codes to look up orders and find out information about rolls of fabric. As for me, I just liked how they resembled little patchwork quilts. So when the staff challenge was announced, the idea of making a QR code quilt seemed perfect.

How novel! If it actually works for code readers, this could be a lot of fun for shops to work with.